5. My first Garden Workday, and piling paths

27 Oct

And so my experiences of being a community garden member continue to grow me and challenge me.

This past Saturday was my first community garden workday.  The community garden workday is a day on the calendar to which each member/plot owner is contractually obligated to attend. These work days are usually spent working on larger projects, projects larger than a single plot. For our work day we tackled weeding and mulching the two main entrance paths. Alas I was too busy helping to spend time snapping photographs so this will be a picture-less post.

In the ten plus years of this particular garden’s existence, path maintenance methods have changed from grassy paths to mulched paths. Both have their merits. The current method is mulch since there is an abundance of free wood chip mulch material delivered to the site by various tree companies. We he piles and piles of it lining our frontage where the trucks dump it. It is a wonderful resource when used properly. Here lies a problem with this method in my opinion. This practice has gone on for several years now. In those years garden members have sought to overcome the weeds in the pathways between each garden with new layers of mulch. Weeds pulled, new mulch laid in. Problem solved. No, problem created I say. I have no problem with the use of this mulch to suppress weeds and to walk upon. I too use this method in my garden at home. From the very same sources, no less. The problem is that there is now an accumulation of many years of this practice upon the grid of paths in our garden. Thus the paths have gotten higher while the plots themselves have remained or in some cases lowered. This problem was exacerbated this past season when our area experienced the wettest summer of the past seventy years. The rains came in but could not get out of most gardens due to such high walkways resulting in lost crops and yields. For many gardeners the potatoes never stood a chance in all that wet. Not to mention all the other low to ground or sprawling vegetables such as squashes and greens. But the weeds loved it. They absolutely loved the neglected growth because it was too rainy for many gardeners to work in. Between records rains, failed crops, and massive weeds, it is sad to say that we lost many a member this past year. Too many members just walked away, paving the way for many new members of course including myself.

When I took on plot #32 this past summer, one of the first tasks I took to doing was this very issue as it existed in my plot. I needed to raise my garden with more soil and lower some of the paths bordering my plot. So I scraped off the weedy top layer of mulch then took the rich soil beneath it and placed it in my beds to raise them up. I have advocated this practice before to my fellow members who laugh at my apparent mounds. Some call them hugelkulture, some call them potatoes. I joke back and call them burial mounds. I had hoped I spread enough of this idea to my neighbors to effect the coming workday. Perhaps I did not talk to enough people. Perhaps I talked to just the right ones. Perhaps the majority simple wanted to accomplish the task as quickly and effortlessly as possible. For whatever reason, the mass of workers accumulated on that day did not scrape up the paths to lower them. They did weed them out some but then they just layered more cardboard and mulch right on top. If that large path gets any higher we could start calling it a wier.

Since I am new to this group I know there is only so much I can say in order to be heard, and not many are going to hear me till time and seasons have proven me out. I am fine with that.

Not all was as bleak as I may seem about the paths. there was a great much work accomplished in the community flower beds. I large overgrowth of Johnson Grass was pulled up and the ryzomes below lifted so they could freeze. Some mysterious slab was discovered beneath this bed that beheld the curiosities of a great many men for a while. If you want to watch men act like boys, bury something in the dirt and they will dig and dig in search of what it is. the leaf pile was cleaned up and quite a few loads of rich compost removed from beneath it. In general it was a very productive day even though I was not able to accomplish anything on my particular plot.

Aside from all the accomplished task, a great deal of talking did occur as can be expected amongst the gardening community. I imagine that community and civilization began as gatherers began to come in, planting fields instead, and they too carried on a great many conversations with their fellow planters. We who grow, love to talk. In our talking, plans were made, ideas shared, and new responsibilites accepted. All in all the coming seasons are looking bright in foresight and this member is looking forward to them.

And this makes five. Five what you say? Follow along here.

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2 Responses to “5. My first Garden Workday, and piling paths”

  1. Ed October 27, 2013 at 10:54 pm #

    Reblogged this on Our Little Garden at 8505 and commented:

    Ok. here’s the fifth.

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  1. Mulching 101 | World Wide Wanderers - October 30, 2013

    […] 5. My first Garden Workday, and piling paths (growingitforward.wordpress.com) […]

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